All posts tagged: Holy Doors

Life After Life After Death

What a way to go! At some point most of us will say it, and when speaking of death usually mean some preferred, or else dreaded, scenario—drowning in a pool of chocolate say, as compared to being drawn and quartered. According to a new Canadian poll though, we are not exactly exhausting ourselves plumbing the metaphysics of the exit. In general, going, happens in one of three ways: Instantaneous, a catastrophic high-impact injury, for example, or a bullet to a so-called kill-zone; Sudden, as when an event results in death moments or hours later, and Delayed.  About this third, we could be glib and say that the leading cause of death is life, but I am talking here about terminal illness, both protracted and brief. I do not think I would be good at any of them, and am in no rush to find out. Unfortunately, over the past year, seven friends have. All “folded their tents early,” and since none lived in a global hot spot, seven seems a startling number. If there was …

Doors of Mercy: Neither Push Nor Pull

I’d like to begin with a list that quickly becomes a confession: the library, a generous amount of independent bookstores, countless tea shops, the corner grocery store, an art museum, my university flat, the chapel, a handful of pubs, a vast variety of European public transit vehicles. This is a non-exhaustive list of places in England with doors that I have not known how to open and have subsequently attempted to open incorrectly, much to my repeated embarrassment. I am studying abroad this semester in Norwich, England, which has meant that the past month has brought its fair share of nuanced cultural differences into my life. This adjustment period has meant that I have often felt substantially less adept at what I would consider to usually be completely basic tasks. Mailing a letter, shopping for groceries, crossing the street, plugging my computer charger into a wall outlet: simple activities that I could once rely completely on my own instincts to accomplish, that now, across the pond, take little moments of extra thought and sometimes even …