All posts tagged: John Cavadini

Guidelines for Any Appropriate Response to the Catholic Abuse Crisis

A Memory and a Hope: The Feast of the Assumption, August 15, 2018. I went to the 5:30 pm Mass at our parish. It was just this day that the Pennsylvania Grand Jury investigation was made public. I felt overcome by a tide of sadness, a very deep sadness in which I could not seem to touch bottom. It was as though all the beautiful things in the world that I had cherished had been tarnished and blasted with corruption and swept away by chaos, scandal, and embarrassment. At the very same time I had the most vivid impression of the beauty of the Feast we were celebrating, here towards summer’s end, contemplating Mary as the Eschatological Icon of the Church. This is as intimate and hopeful and ennobling Truth as any there are. I felt an equal tide of gratitude welling up within me just as deep and maybe even deeper than the sadness I was feeling. This was instead a tide of gratitude for the Church who, for all these centuries, had faithfully …

Am I the Mother of Christ?

A famous reading in the Advent Liturgy of the Hours from Isaac of Stella, Cistercian abbot and contemporary of Bernard of Clairvaux, makes the claim that, among other things, the Christian believer can, like Mary, be a mother of Christ. Beyond the breviary, this has actually become a kind of spiritual commonplace. Every believer can conceive Christ through his or her faith, in a way analogous to Mary. Speaking for myself, I have never known what to make of this comparison. It seems to rest on the double meaning of the word “conceive:” one can conceive in one’s mind, and one can conceive in the womb. But, methinks, these are really, really different realities despite the double entendre. For that reason, perhaps, the comparison has always seemed inert to me, leaving me utterly unmoved. What actually does move me is the wondrous virginal conception of the Word of God in the womb of Mary, the great Mother of God, something so much more stupendous and altogether more marvelous than the metaphorical version of my conception …

The Hidden Vocation of the Catechist

Editor’s note: These remarks were delivered at the annual Echo Mentor Dinner on July 9, 2016. Dear Friends, I recently received a book in the mail, a gift of the author, Michael Foley, who used to teach here. The title seems to sum up our evening together so I’ve brought it so show to you: it’s called Drinking with the Saints. He opens the book with the famous lines from Hilaire Belloc which I am sure you all know, but it never hurts to hear them one more time: Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine There’s always laughter and good red wine, At least I’ve always found it so, Benedicamus Domino! Speaking of the sun, I don’t really remember an Echo Mentor Weekend Dinner for which the weather was not perfect and the summer evening so shot through with seemingly infinite light and warmth that it did not seem symbolic for a moment set apart in the actual infinite. Being suspended in light from up in the Press Box always added to the impression, but …