All posts tagged: sociology

A Process of Evangelization in San Miguel of Guatemala

This essay makes a contribution to the sociology of evangelism or evangelization by first clarifying the basic concepts of proselytism, church growth, conversion, and spiritual transformation. The essay will use the example of a Guatemalan parish, which uses the SINE program (Sistema Integral de Nueva Evangelización). SINE was created by Fr. Alfonso Navarro of Mexico in the early 1980s.[1] The SINE program is followed by more than a thousand parishes in Central America, Mexico, and the South of the United States. Let me begin with a question of terminology. Evangelism is understood as the desire to evangelize, while evangelization is taken as the process, strategy, and structure of evangelizing. This distinction was formulated by the International Congress on World Evangelization in Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1974.[2] In practice, many Protestants use the term evangelism as both the desire to evangelize and as the process of evangelizing, while Catholics often use evangelization for both. For the purpose of clarification and scholarly ecumenism, I will use evangelism as the desire to evangelize and evangelization as a structure, in …

Empowering Parents: Symposium Day 1

Last night, our annual Symposium on Liturgy and the New Evangelization kicked off at Notre Dame (after we were first pummeled with heat, humidity, and an apocalyptic storm in which two inches of rain fell in 20 minutes). Christian Smith and Justin Bartkus gave the public an early view into research on parenting and the transmission of faith. Parenting, as Smith has noted in his work on the National Study of Youth and Religion, matters. Not just a bit. Parents are the most important causal factor for the transmission of faith (or non-transmission) to their children. Here are five insights from their talk at our Symposium, “From Generation to Generation: How American Catholic Parents Today Approach Passing on the Faith to their Children.” The Household is a Culture, and It Can Be Highly Effective: In the midst of various discussions about the need to disengage from culture (often improperly called the Benedict Option), Justin Bartkus noted that actually you can’t disengage from culture. Rather, every household is a culture in miniature making possible a worldview …