All posts tagged: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

The Point Where the Ugliness of Our Individual and Communal Lives Is Transfigured

Throughout its long history, theology has certainly seemed more comfortable understanding itself through its claim to truth or goodness than to beauty. It is not that the connection between theology and beauty has never been notarized. One simply has to recall the early Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and the Dionysian tradition to realize that this is not true—even if beginning with Tertullian and proceeding through the iconoclasm controversy and on to the Reformation, faith in the Cross made it difficult to think of theology and beauty being anything other than bitter rivals, when it came to allure and existential pledge. Of course, throughout the long histories of Catholic, Orthodox, and even Protestant theologies, there have been internal corrections. The Catholic theologian Matthias Scheeben might  represent a correction within the late nineteenth-century form of Neo-Scholasticism, with its forged alliance between propositionalism and moralism. And, of course, in the Reform tradition no theologian showed a greater openness to beauty than Jonathan Edwards, without succumbing in the slightest to the emerging temptation to elevate beauty while essentially dethroning God. Pace …

Music of Holy Week: Holy Thursday

Today we enter the most solemn days of the liturgical year: the Sacred Paschal Triduum. From St. Peter’s in Rome to the humblest of parishes, the Church will watch and pray and sing together, recalling the wondrous mysteries of our salvation in Christ Jesus. I Give to You a New Commandment (2004) by Peter Nardone (b. 1965) In the celebration of the Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper, the presider, after proclaiming the passage from St. John’s Gospel in which Jesus himself washes his Apostles’ feet, will follow the commandment given by our Lord and wash the feet of those in his parish community whom he has been called to serve. The Roman Missal provides several antiphons (most of which are taken from the Johannine narrative) to serve as musical accompaniment for this ritual action, including the commandment of Jesus: “I give you a new commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you, says the Lord” (Jn 13:34). In this simple yet effective setting for children’s choir and mixed choir by Scottish …